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School-Age Child Care Arrangements

Authors: Sharmila Lawrence and J. Lee Kreader
Publication Date: October 2006

This is an excerpt from the full brief.

This range is greater and more complex for school-age children than for infants and toddlers and preschoolers who are primarily in center care, relative care, or nonrelative care.

Findings presented in this brief are drawn from the three most current and comprehensive nationally representative surveys documenting the before-, after-school, and summer activities of school-aged children. The 2005 After-School Programs and Activities Survey of the National Household Education Survey (ASPA-NHES: 2005) and the 2001 Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey of the National Household Education Survey (ASPA-NHES: 2001) both paint a picture of out-of-school time during the school year. The National Survey of America’s Families, 1999, describes summer-time activities.

While the data in this brief illustrate where school-age children spend their out-of-school time, they do not examine whether parents make these arrangements by choice or by default due to constraints such as cost, transportation, and work schedules. Additionally, the data do not examine the availability and quality of school-age child care in communities and how that influences arrangements. However, the ASPA-NHES 2005 data does ask parents to rate the factors that are ‘very important’ in selecting after-school care. This information is included in the brief.