Since you are looking at this site with an older browser, you will not be able to see any graphics or formatting. For better results, please upgrade your browser.

UCR: California Case Study

Unclaimed Children Revisited: California Case Study is a series of county-specific case studies, a statewide analysis, and a set of fiscal analyses of effective policy-linked strategies to improve children’s mental health in the state of California. It is a major component of Unclaimed Children Revisited, a national study that seeks to identify effective state fiscal, infrastructural, training, and related policies that lead to positive outcomes for children and youth. In particular, the California Case Study focuses on policies and practices that support evidence-based practices, family-centered and family-directed care, culturally appropriate care and support services, and early childhood and school-based prevention and early intervention approaches.

This study is a multi-method, multi-level study that includes:

  • An analysis of the state policy context with special attention to specific reform-oriented policies, including the Mental Health Services Act;
  • Eleven in-depth county case studies, including three rural counties, that illustrate aspects of effective mental health service delivery and policy; and
  • A fiscal analysis designed to shed light on the current funding picture and the comparative efficacy of different financing approaches.

When study findings are released, NCCP will use strategic approach to dissemination to leverage significant policy changes to advance children’s mental health. The three key strategies include:

  • Web-based information sharing;
  • A public information campaign involving news and feature releases on the study; and
  • Presenting the findings of the study at key conferences and meetings in support of a sustainable movement for youth and family advocacy.

The California Case Study is guided by a strategic advisory policy work group of California-based researchers, policy makers, providers, family and youth and community leaders. Research for the study is conducted under the auspices of the Institutional Review Board of Columbia University.

NCCP appreciates the generous support of The California Endowment and Zellerbach Family Foundation in funding this study.