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Research Connections Publications

Bibliography, November 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, November 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, November 2017

Brief, November 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, October 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, October 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, July 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, June 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, May 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, March 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, January 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, January 2017

Research-to-Policy Resources, November 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, July 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, June 2016

Bibliography, May 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, May 2016

Brief, April 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, April 2016

Bibliography, April 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, February 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, February 2016

Research-to-Policy Resources, January 2016

Resource List, November 2015

Resource List, November 2015

Resource List, November 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, September 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, September 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, September 2015

Policy Brief, August 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, July 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, June 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, May 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, April 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, February 2015

Research-to-Policy Resources, November 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, November 2014

Bibliography, November 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, October 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, October 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, September 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, August 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, April 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, April 2014

Research-to-Policy Resources, February 2014

Policy Brief, May 2012

This brief examines research on health and safety components that lead to better care and healthier outcomes for children. We discuss research on key CCDF health and safety categories such as prevention and control of infectious disease, safe buildings and physical premises, and health and safety training, as well as nutrition and physical activity, health and developmental screening and consultation, and mental health screening and consultation.

Policy Brief, May 2011

This review examines the current research on the quality of family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care including the difficulties in defining quality; the developmental outcomes of children in FFN care; and strategies strategies to improve the quality of FFN care.

Guide, August 2009

A guide to using survey data from the Census Bureau and administrative data generated by state child care subsidy and other programs to study child care subsidy take-up rates and the relationship between parental employment and child care subsidy receipt.

Bibliography, January 2009

This Guide is an annotated bibliography of existing large scale data sets that provide useful information to policymakers, researchers, state administrators, and others in the field of child care and early education.

Policy Brief, August 2008

Policy Brief, June 2007

This brief highlights current measures of quality in school-age settings as well as indicators linked to high-quality after-school programs and positive child outcomes.

Policy Brief, April 2007

This brief explores challenges in measuring quality in family, friend, and neighbor child care including: parent choice and definitions of quality; concerns with commonly used quality measures originally designed for other settings; quality measurement advances for family, friend, and neighbor care; and testing measures for cultural appropriateness and competency.

Policy Brief, April 2007

This Review of Research package, which includes a Literature Review, a Research Brief, and a Table of Methods and Findings, synthesizes the current research on family child care providers, parental use of family child care, and quality of this type of care.

Policy Brief, March 2007

This brief highlights current models for supporting and enhancing family, friend, and neighbor care and describes initial efforts to evaluate these initiatives.

Policy Brief, October 2006

School-age children spend time in an array of care arrangements. The most common nonparental after-school arrangements are center- or school-based programs, relative care, and self-care.

Policy Brief, June 2006

Child care subsidies have the potential to support parents' employment and children's development. This brief, literature review, and table of methods and findings summarize the growing body of research that describes what parent employment outcomes are associated with the use of child care subsidies.

Policy Brief, January 2006

This Review of Research package, which includes a Literature Review, a Research Brief, and a Table of Methods and Findings, synthesizes the research on the family and child care characteristics associated with the use of child care subsidies.

Policy Brief, August 2005

By 9 months of age, approximately half of all infants are in some kind of regular nonparental child care arrangement—26% with relatives, 13% with nonrelatives (either in the child’s or another family’s home), and 9% in centers. To increase the range of care available, policymakers should consider the full spectrum of arrangements, the hours per week children typically spend in each arrangement type, and the factors involved in parents’ choice of care.

Policy Brief, August 2005

With over half the nation’s infants and toddlers in regular, nonparental child care, the scarcity of high-quality infant and toddler care in centers, family child care homes, and with relatives should be a priority concern for policymakers. Across settings, higher quality care has been associated with lower child-adult ratios, smaller group sizes, specialized caregiver training, and general caregiver education.

Policy Brief, August 2005

While research on the effects of education and training on infant and toddler child care quality is still limited, early findings indicate that various approaches—mentoring, noncredit training, for-credit course work—may be effective with different types of providers at different points in their careers. As policymakers await findings from longterm studies now underway, they should build basic evaluations into their training and education initiatives.

Policy Brief, April 2004

A number of strategies can be successful in promoting language and emergent literacy among preschool-age children. But all of these strategies require or are improved by interaction between adult caregivers and children.