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Pathways to Early School Success Publications

Report, September 2008

One in 10 kindergarten and first grade students are chronically absent. Schools and communities working together, however, can significantly reduce chronic early absence by taking comprehensive approaches for ensuring families understand attendance is a key to their children’s future.

Fact Sheet, February 2008

This fact sheet provides information for policymakers on how maternal, family and cumulative risk affect absenteeism in early schooling.

Report, January 2008

This report is the second in a series examining the causes and consequences of chronic absenteeism during the early school years, based on analyses of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K, National Center for Education Statistics).

Brief, October 2007

This brief is the first in a series examining the causes and consequences of chronic absenteeism during the early school years, based on analyses of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K, National Center for Education Statistics).

Brief, January 2007

What will it take to ensure that young low-income children succeed in the early school years? NCCP’s newest brief will help policymakers and educators understand two important elements: use of an intentional curriculum and professional development and teacher supports.

Report, September 2006

This report features lessons from research and practice about curricular and teacher support strategies that are key to reducing the achievement gap for young, low-income children.

Report, January 2006

Babies and toddlers experiencing high and consistent levels of stress will benefit from these 10 strategies that programs and communities can implement to promote healthy growth and learning. These intensive supports can help change a negative development course to a positive one.

Report, November 2005

Targeted interventions like the ones described in this report can help parents and other early care providers be more effective in promoting healthy relationships and reducing challenging behavior in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. They work best if they are embedded in a larger community effort to promote resilience and build on the strengths that exist in families and communities.

Report, July 2002

This policy paper focuses on young children at risk for poor social, emotional, and behavioral development and what kinds of interventions seem most effective.